Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Joyeuse et pétillante Fête Nationale du 14 Juillet


Joyeuse et pétillante Fête Nationale du 14 Juillet by ©LeDomduVin 2021
Joyeuse et pétillante Fête Nationale du 14 Juillet
by ©LeDomduVin 2021


Joyeuse et pétillante 

Fête Nationale du 14 Juillet 

à vous toutes et tous en France 

et partout dans le monde.



#fetenationale #fetenationalefrancaise #14juillet #quatorzejuillet #joyeusefete #joyeuse #petillante #champagne #vin #wine #vino #wein #lesmemesadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin  


All rights reserved ©LeDomduVin 2021 on all the content of this post above, including but not limited to: pictures, photos, drawings, illustrations, memes, texts, quotes, wines, wine tasting notes, wine descriptions, tables, graphs, etc... 

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Sunday casual white wines

Sunday Causal white wines by ©ledomduvin 2021
Sunday Casual white wines by ©ledomduvin 2021



Sunday casual white wines



Last Sunday, some friends came to eat in the afternoon. We started with some beers and charcuterie for the "apéro". Then, we drank these 3 whites, sipping while cooking and eating "crêpes salées" (savoury crêpes or what was supposed to be "galettes") the whole day, from right after we finished the apéro, roughly from around 4 in the afternoon until they left around midnight. It was fun. 

More especially, that we tried first to make the crêpes with "whole-wheat" flour bought by my friend, who thought that it was the same as the one used in Britanny (Bretagne) to make the "galettes", except that galettes in Britanny are made with "buckwheat", not "whole-wheat".  So, we ended up with some kind of a weird liquid with some lumps of grains floating around, resulting in something similar to "oatmeal" in milk for breakfast. Once into the pan, the substance turned into a doughy disaster looking like a bizarre blob.  

After 2 attempts, I told my friend, the consistency is not good, something is wrong. We blamed it on the pan and the flour. I poured the liquid blob into the sink and, this time prepared the crepes concoction with regular white flour and my own recipe (which include rum and beer).  And ended up making:       
  • Crêpes with ham, mushrooms, cheese and egg. 
  • Crêpes with smoked salmon and mascarpone, lemon. 
  • Crêpes with camembert, mushrooms and emmental. 
😋😋😋😋😋😋😋😋😋😋



After the beers for the apéro with the charcuterie, we opened the following wines (in this order) to pair with the crêpes:  


Drouhin Vaudon Petit Chablis 2018 - Burgundy, France (@maisonjosephdrouhin)
Grape variety: 100% Chardonnay
Price: €14-17 (HKD 130 - 157)

Nice, fresh, medium-bodied, great balance and nicely coating the palate, ample and generous without being heavy, with substance and texture, yellow fruits, mineral notes, with a dash of oak treatment to add dimensions and volume, as well as a delectable buttery taste. Lovely. Nicely done and very satisfying.  


******************************


Villa Sparina Gavi - Piedmonte, Italy 2019  (@villasparina)
Grape variety: 100% Cortese
Price: €11-14  (HKD 100-130) (around HKD 160-180 in HK, weird...)


Always a great value for money, I love this wine. Crisp, fresh, elegant, subtle, mineral, zesty, with great acidity adding both intensity and tension to this great little wine. Lots of minerals, and a barely perceivable pinch of saltiness. I love this type of light and racy whites made between the mountains and the sea. So light, vibrant and refreshing. I could drink tons of this wine. 

I used to buy and sell a lot of this specific wine when I was working as a "caviste" in the rich neighbourhood of Brooklyn Heights (NYC). It has been one of my favorite summer whites for nearly 2 decades.    

(But, I must admit that I love mountainous whites from pretty much anywhere around the Alps, Northern Italy, but also Switzerland and France too of course, and Austria. Same around the Pyrenees too). 😋😁


****************************


Chateau Haut Bertinerie Blanc - Blaye, Cotes de Bordeaux, France  2018 (@chateau_bertinerie)
Grape Variety: 100% Sauvignon Blanc (old vines)
Price: €13-16 (HKD 120-150)

As I am from a little village located between the Côtes de Bourg and Côtes de Blaye, I was eager to taste this wine, as it is from the region where I grew up. And I know the red, but never tried the white before. 

The colour was already light gold, (and much more pronounced than the previous 2 wines, despite the vintage), which is usually a sign of good intensity but could also be a sign that the wine has evolved already (not always a good thing for white Bordeaux, trust me on that). 

Overall, medium to full-bodied, quite rich and generous, layered, nicely made and well balanced. Yet, it appeared slightly heavy for my taste/palate. Especially after drinking two rather dry and light wines, it almost tasted fruity sweet and very ripe (definitely heavier and fuller too). The oak treatment is noticeable, yet integrated, and add dimensions and volume, but also weight. Quite intense and fat. 

It is a personal opinion, but it tasted more like a "wintery" white for me. Surely very comforting when it is cold outside, but definitely too heavy for my palate to really be enjoyed during the summer months, more especially with the heat and humidity here in Hong Kong.   

I must be honest, it was not what I was expecting, yet, it is well made and tasty, and still, it remains a great value for money at this price. Consequently, my advice is: to drink it if you like a heavier style of whites, even during summer, or keep it in your cellar or wine fridge (or wherever you keep your wine) for the Fall and/or Winter, to be paired with white meat and creamy sauce, or a well seasoned roasted chicken.  



That's all folks for today! 


Thank you for reading my post, and until next time, be safe, take good care of yourself and give some love to each other, 'cause that's all we got!

Cheers! Santé!

LeDomduvin (aka Dominique Noel)  



#lesphotosadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin #casual #casualwines #sundaywines #friendsathome #crepes #wine #vin #vino #wein 



All rights reserved ©LeDomduVin 2021 on all the content of this post above, including but not limited to: pictures, photos, drawings, illustrations, memes, texts, quotes, wines, wine tasting notes, wine descriptions, tables, graphs, etc... 

Friday, June 18, 2021

Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 - Jeroboam (5L)


Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L) by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L)
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021


Ripples...




This could be the title of one of my new music tracks (I'm working on), and this first picture (above) could be the perfect cover for this track... 



Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L) by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L)
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021



But no, not just yet... 



Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L) by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L)
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021



For now, these ripples are pieces of history, the sign of a time that has been and has passed, the result of an artisanal craft that is no longer in favour but still has its adepts and defenders: hand-blown glass. 



Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L) by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L)
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021



Yes, these are the ripples on the external surface of an old and extremely rare bottle of wine: Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 (again), but, "Jeroboam" this time (5L). An old lady (as I like to call these old and rare bottles of wine) in need of TLC. Probably one of the last remaining specimen of her kind.   




Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L) by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L)
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021



These ripples were created by the defaults, bubbles and asperities resulting from the hand-blown glass process, giving the surface of this particular bottle a certain roughness and unevenness, taking a liquid appearance when on a certain angle under the light. 

Mesmerizing, isn't it? 

Personally, I could look at these ripples for a long while and not get tired of their sight. 



Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L) by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Ripples..... Château Lafite Rothschild 1959 Jeroboam (5L)
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021



I love taking care of these old and rare ladies. I always feel humbled and privileged in their presence. They are rare gems and treasures to be protected and preserved, and it is my role and duty to do so. Very lucky to be able to work and have access to such great bottles on a daily basis. Real pieces of history. 

A few days ago was that time of the month again, my visit to the private cellar full of rare and fine old ladies. Coming in all shapes and sizes, like this sleeping beauty, a Jeroboam of Lafite 1959 with its original label and capsule, good level and plenty of stories to tell just by looking at its ripples.

Cheers! Santé!

Stay safe and take good care of yourself, family and friends, and give each other some love, 'cause that's all we got!

Dom

LeDomduVin (aka Dominique Noel)





PS: If interested to listen to my music, you can find some of my music tracks under my other alias "Domelgabor" on YouTube, Spotify, Soundcloud, Apple Music and most of the top music platforms under "Domelgabor" or "Domelgabor Topic" (and even on Instagram and Facebook at @domelgabor and @domelgabor_music)


Also, some people asked me why I use this filter/color for most of my wine pictures. To answer I will say that I use this filter/color as: 
  • It makes the picture look nicer and smoother, 
  • It also enhances the light and harmonizes the colors, (which can be dull or dark and/or yellow when shooting in a cellar). 
  • This particular filter/color is also my personalized touch and it gives a sepia-like vintage aspect that I love.
  • And, to a certain extent, it also protects my pictures from anyone who might intend to use them or do copies, and from counterfeiters to use them as references for the bottle and label colors and fonts and other details.

Dom

@chateaulafiterothschild #chateaulafiterothschild #pauillac #bordeaux #bordeauxclassic #legendarywines #grandcruclasse #jeroboam #france #wine #vin #vino #wein #oldandrareladies #oldandrarevintages #oldandrarebottles #olandrarewines #lesphotosadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin ©LeDomduVin 2021



All rights reserved ©LeDomduVin 2021 on all the content of this post above, including but not limited to: pictures, photos, drawings, illustrations, memes, texts, quotes, wines, wine tasting notes, wine descriptions, tables, graphs, etc... 

Château Lafite 1959 - Double Magnum (3L)


Château Lafite 1959 (3L) by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Château Lafite 1959 (3L)
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021



Château Lafite 1959 (3L) 



A few days ago was that time of the month again, my visit to the private cellar full of old and rare and fine ladies. Coming in all shapes and sizes, like this sleeping beauty, a double magnum of Lafite 1959 with pristine label and capsule, and high level (reconditioned at the Château, in the late 90s or early 2000s, don't remember exactly). 

A rare (and difficult to find) large format bottle commanding an estimated lowest price at around HKD 155,000 (USD 20,000 or Euros 16,500), knowing that the only and highest price on Wine-Searcher is around HKD 450,000 (roughly USD 58,000 or Euro 48,000)... 



Château Lafite 1959 (3L) by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Château Lafite 1959 (3L)
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021


At that price, no wonder why Lafite is one of the most coveted wines in the world by counterfeiters. 

A beautiful bottle in any case and surely one of the last remaining specimens of her kind.  

Cheers! Santé!

LeDomduVin (aka Dominique Noel)



@chateaulafiterothschild #chateaulafiterothschild #pauillac #bordeaux #bordeauxclassic #legendarywines #grandcruclasse #france #wine #vin #vino #wein #oldandrareladies #oldandrarevintages #oldandrarebottles #olandrarewines #lesphotosadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin ©LeDomduVin 2021




All rights reserved ©LeDomduVin 2021 on all the content of this post above, including but not limited to: pictures, photos, drawings, illustrations, memes, texts, quotes, wines, wine tasting notes, wine descriptions, tables, graphs, etc... 

Cupid sitting on a roof...

Cupid sitting on a roof - artist unknown - original picture modified and enhanced by @domelgabor
Cupid sitting on a roof - artist unknown -
Original picture modified and enhanced by @domelgabor 2021



Cupid sitting on a roof...


Don't ask me why, but I love this picture, and Cupid is all about love.

Cupid sitting on a roof carries the message that love is never too far, for anyone who is willing to see it and nurture it, whatever that love can be. 

Love for your girlfriend or boyfriend. Love for your partner or spouse. Love for your children and family. Love for your pets and animals. Love for the sun rising in the morning and the moon enlightening the night. Love for the oceans and seas. Love for the mountains and valleys. Love for people. Love for nature. Love for food and wine. Love for music and arts and cultures and diversity. Love for...

There are so many kinds of love, it would be difficult to list them all. Let's just say that love is all around and life is all about love. 

So give each other love, 'cause that's all we got! 

Dom

Domelgabor for LeDomduVin 2021 

Photo credit: author unknown (found on the internet, no source or name), but whoever that may be, thank you for it. Original picture modified and enhanced by @domelgabor (my other alias)

#cupid #cupidonaroof #love #loveisnevertoofar #loveisallaround #messageoflove #lesselectionsadom 
#domelgabor @domelgabor ©Domelgabor #ledomduvin @ledomduvin ©LeDomduVin 2021



Unless stated otherwise, all rights reserved ©LeDomduVin 2021 on all the content of this post above, including but not limited to: pictures, photos, drawings, illustrations, memes, texts, quotes, wines, wine tasting notes, wine descriptions, tables, graphs, etc... 

Thursday, June 17, 2021

Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine


Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (1)



Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine




It is that time of the month again. Every month, after doing the stocktaking and making sure that there is no discrepancies nor any variations in the stocks, I discard all the expensive empty bottles of wine. 

Discarding these expensive empty bottles is an important task, and even necessary (monthly or bimonthly), to prevent them from being found, re-used, put back and sold on the grey market by counterfeiters, con artists and other crooks.



Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (2)
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (2)



It might sound absurd, to some of you, yet, you wouldn't believe the price some counterfeiters are ready to pay for an original empty bottle, (moreover with the label intact and in good conditions), from a famous producer, especially those from the top Grand Crus Chateaux of Bordeaux and the top Domaines & Maisons de Bourgogne (Burgundy).  

In fact, the value of an empty bottle from any of the first growths (or same pedigree) of both banks in Bordeaux (especially old vintages, obviously) and top tears burgundy such as DRC, Jayer, Armand Rousseau, Leroy, Leflaive, etc... can get quite high, and even mind-boggling for the bottles that are engraved like Petrus and Haut-Brion, for example.    




Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (3)
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (3)



Consequently, the labels have to be disfigured, and the bottles, (more especially the old and rare ones and the ones that are engraved like Petrus and Haut-Brion, for example), have to be broken into pieces.

 

Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (4)
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (4)



And that's what I do for a little hour once a month. As you can see on the pictures above and below, I take a marker and "disfigure" the labels, with a rather elegantly abstract artistic touch. 😁 

I take a lot of pleasure doing it, as, as a "Wine Quality Control Director", it is my duty and responsibility to make sure that it is done, and properly done. So, I rather do it myself. 



Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (5)
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (5)



Yet, disfiguring and breaking these bottles is also heartbreaking, as I have been taking care and giving a lot of TLC to these "old ladies", (as I like to call them), for these past 9 years. I know them well. They are like my babies. 



Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (6)
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (6)



Sometimes, if possible, (as some are really hard to remove), I keep some labels for my own private collection. I use them as references to compare them with others when I do bottles inspection / authentication. 



Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (7)
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (7)



Fortunately, some labels escaped and were spared from disfigurement, too rare to be penned with my artistic touch. 😉😁👍🍷

Not all of them could be saved, though... too hard to remove from the bottle ... 😢



Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (8)
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (8)



I did 2 little videos while disfiguring the labels and breaking the bottles, I will upload them as soon as I manage to figure out how.  

This last picture shows the big rubbish bin I used, filled with a countless amount of broken expensive bottles of wine, after destroying them all one by one. 

Don't worry they didn't have time to suffer... 😁👍



Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (9)
Discarding expensive empty bottles of wine
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021 (9)



Descriptions of the bottles on the pictures above 


- Picture 1 - 
  • DRC Romanee-Saint-Vivant Marey-Monge 1996 (× 2)  ( @_domainedelaromaneeconti )
  • Paul Jaboulet Aine Hermitage La Chapelle 1990 ( @pauljabouletaine ) 
  • Château Rayas Reserve 1995 ( @chateaurayas )

- Picture 2 - 
  • Château Lafite Rothschild 1986  ( @chateaulafiterothschild )
  • Château La Mission Haut-Brion 1996  ( @chateaulamissionhautbrion )
  • Château Rayas Reserve 1995 ( @chateaurayas )
  • Château Lafleur Pomerol 1981  ( @chateau_lafleur )

- Picture 3 - 
  • Château Léoville Las Cases 1986 ( @chateauleovillelascases )
  • Château Cos d'Estournel 1986 ( @cosdestournel )
  • Château Le Bon Pasteur 1986 ( @chateaulebonpasteur )
  • Château Trotanoy 1990 ( @chateautrotanoy )

- Picture 4 - 
  • DRC La Tache 1990 & 1995 ( @_domainedelaromaneeconti )
  • Château Haut-Brion 1986 ( @chateauhautbrion_ )

- Picture 5 - 
  • Chateau Cheval Blanc 1990 ( @chateauchevalblanc_ )
  • Petrus 1985 ( @chateaupetrus ) 
  • Chateau Pape Clement 1990 ( @chateaupapeclement ) 
  • Chateau Ausone 1995  ( @chateau_ausone_officiel )

- Picture 6 - 
  • DRC La Tache 1993 ( @_domainedelaromaneeconti )
  • DRC Romanee Conti 1967  ( @_domainedelaromaneeconti )
  • Jaboulet Hermitage La Chapelle 1961 & 1978 ( @pauljabouletaine )
  • Henry Jayer Vosne-Romanee Cros-Parantoux 1978 ( #henrijayer )

- Picture 7 - 
  • Château d'Yquem 1929  ( @yquem_official  )
  • Petrus 1961 (I have doubt on that particular label, I wonder... 🤔🤔🤔) and Petrus 1978 ( @chateaupetrus )
  • Château Mouton Rothschild 1986  ( @moutonnechange )
  • Château Latour 1959 & 1982  ( #chateaulatour  )
  • DRC Romanee Conti 1967  ( @_domainedelaromaneeconti )
  • Chateau Lafite Rothschild 1959  ( @chateaulafiterothschild )

- Picture 8 - 
  • Petrus 1961 (I have doubts on that label, I wonder 🤔🤔🤔,.. some details are different from other Petrus 61 I have seen in my 30 years career...)  ( @chateaupetrus )
  • Château d'Yquem 1929 ( @yquem_official )
  • Henri Jayer Vosne-Romanee Cros-Parantoux 1978  ( #henrijayer )
  • Château Latour 1959 & 1961 ( #chateaulatour )
  • Jaboulet Hermitage La Chapelle 1961 & 1978  ( @pauljabouletaine )

- Picture 9 - 

A big rubbish bin filled with a countless amount of broken expensive bottles of wine, after destroying them all one by one.  


Voilà! That's all folks for today.  

Thank you for reading my post, and take good care of yourself, your family and friends, and give each other love, 'cause that's all we got! 

Cheers! Santé! 

Dom

LeDomduVin (aka Dominique Noel) 


PS: A lot of bottles were harmed in the process, and I sincerely send my deepest condolences to the Chateaux and Domaines, but it was for a good cause... please do not call the "Wine Bottle Rights Organizations" on me, I know it is cruel, but I'm only doing what's right! One day you'll understand... 😉😁 



#disfiguring #disfiguringlabels #discarding #discardingemptybottles #emptybottles #expensive #bottles #expensivewines #expensivebottles #vin #wine #vino #wein #lesphotosadom #lesvideosadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin


All content above, (and on www.ledomduvin.com blog/website in general), including but not limited to texts, quotes, memes, pictures, photos, illustrations, drawings, graphs, tables and even some music tracks, is subject to copyright ©LeDomduVin 2021. 

Monday, May 31, 2021

Is your glass half empty or half full?


Half empty or half full? by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021
Half empty or half full?
by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021



Half empty or half full? 


"People who wonder if the glass is half empty or half full miss the point. The glass is refillable. So, there is always room for more. And, after all, it doesn't really matter as long as there is some wine in it!" - Dom 


Meme created by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021

Cheers! Santé! And take good of yourselves and give each other some love, 'cause that's all we got! 


LeDomduVin (aka Dominique Noel) 



#halfemptyhalffull #halfemtpyorhalffull #glassofwine #lesmemesadom #wine #vin #vino #wein #fact #life #lifeinwine #wineinlife #wineislife #lifeiswine #ledomduvin @ledomduvin

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Petrus 1947 (J. Vandermeulen-Decannière label)


Petrus 1947  (J. Vandermeulen-Decannière label) by ©LeDomduVin 2021
Petrus 1947  (J. Vandermeulen-Decannière label)
by ©LeDomduVin 2021



Petrus 1947 
(J. Vandermeulen-Decannière label)




Not the first time I post pictures of that particular bottle, but I like that bottle. It is a valuable piece of history. It is also a remnant of a time long gone, when the Châteaux were still selling entire barrels of their wine to Negociants and other wine merchants (in Britain, Belgium, Netherlands, etc...), who in turn aged the wine in their own cellar, prior to bottle it and dress the bottle with their own labels and capsules. 

People may say "it is fake", but no, it is real. I had many opportunities to inspect it properly, and it is not a counterfeit. Moreover, it is a bottle that was bought, back in 2013, as a part of a series of J. Vandermeulen-Decannière bottled wines offered at a Christie's wine auction. 

Interestingly the colour of the bottle is red/amber, instead of the usual green (antique or darker), which is not unheard-of, but still quite rare. 

Another interesting detail is the mention of  "1er Grand Crû Pomerol" on the label, which on the Chateau label occasionally also appeared as "1er des Grands Crus Pomerol" and sometimes even "Cru exceptionnel"  on certain labels from certain vintages. 




Petrus 1947  (J. Vandermeulen-Decannière label) by ©LeDomduVin 2021
Petrus 1947  (J. Vandermeulen-Decannière label)
by ©LeDomduVin 2021




As Petrus label constantly changed with each vintage, even sometimes for the same vintage, as they used different printers and different fonts (yes, even for the same vintage), Petrus label is perhaps one of the easiest labels to counterfeit, making it one of the most difficult wine label to inspect and verify its authenticity. 

Always very privileged and humbled to be in the presence of such an old lady, a gem of a bottle, and take care of her. 

Cheers! Santé!

LeDomduVin (a.k.a Dominique Noel)


PS: Just a reminder that these bottles are not mine and they do not belong to me. They belong to a private cellar I take care of occasionally. And I probably will never get the chance to taste them.    


#petrus @petrus @chateaupetrus #pomerol #bordeaux #bordeauxclassic #legendarywines #france #vin #wine #wein #vino #lesphotosadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin #nineteenfourtyseven #wineporn

Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC)


Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC) by ©LeDomduVin 2021
Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC)
by ©LeDomduVin 2021



Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC)




Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC) by ©LeDomduVin 2021
Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC)
by ©LeDomduVin 2021



There is not that many full OWC cases of this legendary wine, like this one, left in the world. I am always amazed and humbled by the presence of such a piece of history and what it represents. 



Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC) by ©LeDomduVin 2021
Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC)
by ©LeDomduVin 2021




As a Sommelier/Wine Buyer and Wine Quality Control Director, I feel very privileged to be able to take care of these old ladies, (as I like to call them), that are even still in their original hay-straw sleeves. 




Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC) by ©LeDomduVin 2021
Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC)
by ©LeDomduVin 2021




What a beautiful case, full of old and rare bottles that have survived all these decades and will probably last a few more, if everything goes well and no one drinks them too fast. 😀😁🍷👍




Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC) by ©LeDomduVin 2021
Château Mouton Rothschild 1945 (OWC)
by ©LeDomduVin 2021



Cheers! Santé!

LeDomduVin (a.k.a Dominique Noel)


PS: Just a reminder that these bottles are not mine and they do not belong to me. They belong to a private cellar I take care of occasionally. And I probably will never get the chance to taste them.    


@moutonnechange #moutonrothschild #chateaumoutonrothschild #pauillac #bordeaux #bordeauxclassic #legendarywines #grandcruclasse #france #wine #vin #vino #wein #oldandrareladies #oldandrarevintages #oldandrarebottles #olandrarewines #lesphotosadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin #nineteenfourtyfive #wineporn

Wednesday, May 5, 2021

The PADAWINE - MAY THE WINE BE WITH YOU

The PADAWINE

MAY THE WINE BE WITH YOU






After the WHITE and the RED, I had to create the ROSÉ

The PADAWINE
MAY THE WINE BE WITH YOU
created by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021

"The Padawan" original concept drawing by Jiwoo Lee in 2020
at @jiwooleeart on Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/jiwooleeart/?hl=en) 
(another link: https://line.17qq.com/articles/qmhfmshny.html)
Thank you Jiwoo Lee 👍👌🙏🙏🙏

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

MACE WINEDU - MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU

MACE WINEDU

MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU




MACE WINEDU MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU by ©LeDomduVin 2021





I could not resist doing another one, so here is:


MACE WINEDU
MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU
created by and for ©LeDomduVin 2021


#maythe4thbewithyou #maythe4th #maytheforcebewithyou #macewinedu #starwars #starwarswine #starwarsandwine #wine #vin #vino #wein #lesmemesadom #lescreationsadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin ©ledomduvin

OBI WINE KENOBI - MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU

 OBI WINE KENOBI

MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU


OBI WINE KENOBI - MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU by ©LeDomduVin 2021




OBI WINE KENOBI - MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU
by ©LeDomduVin 2021


PS: Original picture amended by and for ©LeDeDomduVin 2021 (for this post), found online, credit to its author (as the name was not mentioned).


#maythe4thbewithyou #maythe4th #maytheforcebewithyou #obiwinekenobi #starwars #starwarswine #starwarsandwine #wine #vin #vino #wein #lesmemesadom #lescreationsadom #ledomduvin @ledomduvin ©ledomduvin

UGCB Hong Kong April 2021 - Bordeaux 2020 En Primeur Tasting


LeDomduVin at UGCB En Primeurs Vintage 2020 - Hong Kong April 2021


UGCB Hong Kong April 2021 

Bordeaux 2020 En Primeur Tasting




Une fois n'est pas coutume, je vais écrire ce « post » en Français. Alors voilà, Mardi 27 Avril, je suis allé à la dégustation de l’ UGCB (Union des Grands Crus de Bordeaux) des "Bordeaux En Primeur 2020" (au Rosewood Hôtel Hong Kong), pour me faire une idée du millésime et de la qualité de ses vins.




L'organisation de la dégustation

Merci à Cristina Carranco et Jiming Lu, de Business France China - Hong Kong office, qui ont fait du super boulot qu'en a l'organisation et au bon déroulement de cette dégustation, difficile à organiser et à préparer dans les conditions et la situation actuelles dues à la COVID-19 et aux restrictions qui s'imposent.

Organiser une telle dégustation tout en respectant les gestes barrières et les restrictions imposées dues au virus, n’est pas chose facile. Heureusement, l’équipe de Business France qui s’en occupe sait s’adapter en fonction des changements et des nouvelles restrictions, tout en essayant d’améliorer les conditions de dégustations et de ce fait l’expérience de la dégustation en elle-même à chaque événement. Chapeau !

L’année dernière en Novembre 2020, j’avais aussi dégusté les vins de l’UGCB au Rosewood Hôtel (millésime 2017). L’organisation faisait que nous ne pouvions être que 4 personnes maximum à déguster en même temps, dans une même salle, par session de 1h30 (sur rendez-vous uniquement). Les vins avaient été disposés sur des tables formant un rectangle au sein duquel 2-3 personnes de l'hôtel servaient les vins, au fur et à mesure que chaque dégustateur faisait le tour du rectangle pour goûter les vins. (Vous pouvez lire mon post - en Anglais - sur cette dégustation du millésime 2017, ici)

Alors, si on fait un petit calcul rapide, pour cette dégustation du millésime 2017, il n’y avait donc que 4 personnes par salle de dégustation (dans 7 salles en tout, reparties sur deux étages) et par session de 1h30 chacune (avec 5 sessions dans une journée), ce qui fait un total de 140 personnes maximum par jour, ce qui n’est pas beaucoup, tout en sachant qu’il y a toujours des désistements de dernière minute et d’autres qui ne viennent même pas. 

Et ce n'est vraiment pas assez pour promouvoir les vins de Bordeaux et assurer un minimum de ventes après coup, surtout quand on pense que l'UGCB Hong Kong accueille habituellement facilement 3 à 4 fois plus de dégustateurs (pro, connaisseurs et amateurs). Malheureusement, COVID-19 oblige, l'UGCB et Business France sont obligés de suivre les règles et de respecter les restrictions afin que la dégustation puisse quand même se faire.    

Pour cette dégustation du millésime 2020 « En Primeurs », afin d’accommoder le plus de participants possible et dans les meilleurs conditions possibles, (accessible la encore seulement par rendez-vous confirmé uniquement), les salles avaient été préparées pour pouvoir accueillir un nombre de personnes toujours limité, mais plus important que seulement 4 par salle, et pour un temps toujours délimité, mais  de 2h cette fois (ma session était de 12h45 à 14h45 par exemple).   

Par conséquent, pour le 2020, chaque salle de dégustation avait été arrangée, comme une classe d’école, avec une table par dégustateur et une douzaine de table environ par salle, ce qui multiplie par 3 le nombre de participants. Une bonne chose, le millésime 2020 étant bien meilleur que 2017 et donc suscitant bien plus d’intérêt pour de nombreux acheteurs (-euses) et dégustateurs (-trices) (*).





L'arrivée à l'étage de la dégustation, le formulaire à remplir

Etant arrivé avec 20 minutes d’avance, je pris le temps de faire quelques photos de cet hôtel somptueux tout en parcourant les couloirs me menant à la dégustation. Le Rosewood est un hôtel de luxe et de haut standards. Ça se sent et ça se voit, du sol au plafond, dès le premier pas dans le hall d’entrée, dans l’ascenseur, dans les couloirs et même dans les toilettes. Marbre partout, orné de boiseries rares, précieuses et même exotiques, où l’art est omniprésent, des peintures aux photos, en passant par les sculptures, poteries, porcelaines et autres objets de décoration, le tout arrangé de façon élégante, simple, sobre et sophistiquée a la fois, et dans les moindres détails. L’ambiance y est feutrée, riche, plaisante, confortable et accessible, « touchable », pas comme dans ces hôtels où tout est tellement beau mais tellement figé aussi qu’on a peur de casser quelque chose rien qu’avec le regard.

A l’entrée du couloir qui mène aux salles de dégustations, deux personnes derrière la réception m’interpellent avec un grand sourire, me prennent la température (36.5°C), me demandent mon « e-ticket » nominatif, le scannent, et me demandent de remplir un formulaire de déclaration de santé ( la procédure habituelle dans la plupart des endroits publics depuis le début de cette pandémie), consistant en mon nom, prénom, contact, plus quelques questions auxquelles il vaut mieux répondre « NON » si vous voulez déguster, du genre:

Avez -vous été infecté par le COVID-19 ?

Avez-vous voyagé en dehors de Hong Kong au cours des 14 derniers jours ?

Avez-vous été en contact avec quelqu'un qui pourrait être ou qui a été infecté au cours des 14 derniers jours ?

Avez-vous été dans des endroits où des cas infectés ont été signalés au cours des 14 derniers jours ?

La salle n’étant pas encore prête, je leur dis que je vais prendre quelques photos de plus. L’une d’elles me propose de me prendre en photo devant la grande photo de la dégustation avec le logo de l’UGCB, la preuve irréfutable que j’y étais. Quelle ne fut pas ma déception de réaliser en scrutant la photo, que peu importe la pose, les 6-8 kilos en trop que j’essaie de perdre depuis plus d’un an maintenant, sont plus que visibles et loin d’être très valorisants, ajoutant à mon physique déjà peu flatteur des rondeurs désavantageuses dont il n’a nul besoin. Mais bon, c’est la vie… surtout quand, comme moi, on aime bien manger et boire.



La salle et les règles à respecter,



La personne m’accompagne jusqu’à la salle numéro 3, où je vais passer les 2 prochaines heures à déguster les vins. L’impression de me retrouver dans une salle d’examens me traverse l’esprit à la vue des tables pour l’instant vides, où trônent 5 verres de vins, vides eux-aussi, une bouteille d’eau, un carnet de dégustation, un livret avec les descriptions et photos de chaque propriétés de l’UGCB, ainsi qu’une liste des vins de la dégustations afin de cocher ceux que l’on désire déguster et les règles à respecter (voir photo).

Parmi les 3-4 premiers dans la salle avec encore quelques minutes avant le début de la dégustations, j’en ai profité pour prendre les bouteilles en photos, faire des vidéos et des « Live » sur Facebook, avant de m'assoir a ma table.

Regardant la liste avec attention, j'essaie de faire une sélection des vins que je vais gouter parmi la centaine de vins présents. Deux heures ça passe vite, et je crains ne pas avoir le temps de tout gouter. Même en passant seulement environ une minute par vin, le temps du service en lui-même me fera perdre du temps.

En même temps que je sélectionne les vins qui me semblent être les plus présentatifs de leurs appellations respectives, en me basant sur mes 30 années d’expérience de gouter, déguster et boire les vins de Bordeaux, (moi-même étant Bordelais et petit-fils de vigneron des Côtes de Bourg et Côtes de Blaye), ainsi que sur mes souvenirs et résultats et annotations des 3 derniers millésimes (2017, 2018 et 2019) des vins de l’UGCB, je repense au millésime en lui-même aussi.





L'importance du Millésime et son influence sur les vins dits "En Primeur"



Que l'on soit Sommelier, Négociants, Cavistes, acheteurs pour la GD ou tout autres sortes d'acheteurs de vins (connaisseurs et amateurs inclus), il est toujours bon, et même important, de rester informé et de diversifier la source de ses informations sur les différentes conditions et qualités des millésimes, en fonction des régions et des appellations, (voir même des particularités de certaines propriétés sur des terroirs bien spécifiques), de la plupart des régions de France, mais aussi d'Europe et des grandes régions vitivinicoles du monde en général, et tout au long de l'année si possible.

La presse du vin ainsi que les réseaux sociaux et sites internet spécialisés sur le vin nous informe de façon quotidienne, et dans toutes les régions du monde, de façon consistante, et voire même de plus en plus précise. Pour n'en citer que quelques uns en dehors des magazines (tels que Wine Spectator, Decanter, La Revue des Vins de France, etc...) et des Wine Critics (James Suckling, Jancis Robinson, Jeb Dunnuck, Yves Beck, et j'en passe), il existe de nombreux autres sites tout aussi intéressants pour se renseigner sur les conditions des millésimes, comme: .




Cela permet de bien se préparer avant d'aller à ce genre de dégustation "En Primeur", où les vins sont très (trop ?) jeunes et leur goût encore très influencé par les facteurs de qualités (bons et/ou mauvais) du millésime (ainsi que ceux de la période des vendanges ainsi que du savoir-faire de celui ou celle qui fait le vin, ne pas l’oublier)(**).

Les vins sont à peine finis : certains ayant juste fini la fermentation malolactique, d'autres ont un assemblage qui a juste été réalisé pour l'occasion (mais ne sera pas forcement l'assemblage final), et bien sûr, tout en prenant aussi en considération que l'élevage en barrique vient à peine de commencer pour la plus part de ces vins, donnant une impression de vins trop boisés ou même astringents pour certains.

Je l’ai toujours dit et je le répète, à mon avis et de façon très imagée ou métaphorique si vous préférez, (les âmes sensibles sont priées de s’abstenir de lire la prochaine phrase et de passer de suite au prochain paragraphe), le vin « En Primeur » est comme un fœtus que l’on retirerai du ventre de sa mère avant l’heure, dans les premiers mois de sa conception, pour évaluer son état de santé et se faire une idée de son potentiel afin d’anticiper son évolution (voir éventuellement pour évaluer et corriger certains défauts dans certains cas), avant de le remettre dans le ventre de sa mère pour qu’il puisse finir son évolution avant le véritable accouchement plusieurs mois plus tard (c’est-à-dire, l’embouteillage après l’élevage en barrique dans le cas du vin).

D'où l’importance du millésime et de sa connaissance lorsqu’on goute « En Primeur ». Par conséquent, il est préférable de lire, ou relire, des articles sur le sujet auparavant, afin de se rafraichir l'esprit et avoir une idée un peu plus précise de ce qu’est ou devrait être la qualité des vins en fonctions des conditions du millésime et des évènements météorologiques et climatiques survenus durant le cycle végétatif de la vigne (de la mi-mars à la mi-novembre), incluant les conditions juste avant et durant les vendanges, pour le millésime en question.

Connaitre un minimum sur le millésime aide généralement à anticiper les conditions et qualités des vins « En Primeur » qui vont être dégustés, afin de pouvoir comprendre d'éventuels defaults, irrégularités et/ou angularités, pouvant être du a différents facteurs, suivant les conditions météorologiques et climatiques et de leurs influences sur la vigne et son évolution durant le cycle végétatif, durant les vendanges, et même éventuellement après, durant la fabrication et l'élevage des vins aux chais.



Les vins « En primeur » étant jeunes et, pour ainsi dire « inachevés », (ou en cours de développement et d’évolution, si vous préférez), sont donc, par conséquent, « fragiles », et peuvent facilement être affectés par d’autres facteurs externes, comme les conditions de stockage et de transport, entre le départ de la propriété et l’ouverture de la bouteille avant dégustation. Tous scenarios restent possibles, plausibles et imaginables.

Donc, en deux mots, voici un bref rappel des conditions climatiques du millésime 2020 a Bordeaux:

2020 a été une année assez bonne dans l'ensemble, mais variable en fonctions des appellations, qui a donnée des vins bons a très bons, voir même a des vins au potentiel exceptionnel pour certains Châteaux. Donc une année plutôt qualitative.


Les saisons et le cycle végétatif de la vigne ont suivi un schéma similaire à celui de 2016, 2018 et 2019, dans la mesure où le printemps fut humide, suivi d'un été sec et chaud, couronné par une récolte chaude et sèche. Contrairement à 2016 et 2019, c'était un millésime précoce - pas sans rappeler 2018 en termes de "timing".


Le débourrement précoce a conduit à une floraison plutot précoce, en mai, ce qui a été vraiment une chance, car la grande majorité des raisins rouges ont fini par être cueillis en septembre, juste avant les fortes pluies d'octobre.


En fait, les Bordelais ont eu de la chance, car, malgré les apparences 2020 a été une année très contrastée au niveau du temps, avec énormément de pluie de la mi-Avril a la mi-Mai, puis encore au début du mois de Juin, et de puissants orages de la mi-Aout jusqu'à fin Aout (surtout la nuit), donc énormément d'eau pour la vigne, qui a pourtant un petit peu souffert d'un petit peu plus d'une 50aine de jour avec un temps très sec entre la mi-juin et la mi-aout, certains parlant même de sècheresse durant cette période.








Au cours des semaines qui viennent de passer, j'ai pu lire, à droite à gauche, sur différents sites spécialisés et aussi dans la presse, ainsi que sur les réseaux sociaux, que le millésime 2020 est un « GRAND » millésime. Qu'il serait même le 3ème volet d' « une belle trilogie » de grands millésimes que serait 2018, 2019 et 2020, pour les vins de Bordeaux.

Ceux qui me connaissent bien savent que je ne jure que par mes papilles gustatives et ne me fie que très peu et très rarement aux notes (et aux descriptions) attribuées par les "Wine Critics" et autres dégustateurs reconnus, auxquelles je n’accorde pas vraiment l’importance qu’elles semblent encore avoir sur certaines personnes. Et ce depuis presque 30 ans de carrière dans le vin.

Ce qui ne m'empêche pas de lire ce qu'ils ont à dire sur le sujet, sans forcément être influencé d’une façon ou d’une autre, car il m’arrive souvent d’avoir une opinion complètement différente de la leurs sur certains vins. Donc, je ne prends jamais leurs notes et descriptions pour acquis. Comme pour tout, je préfère me faire ma propre opinion.

Mais, je les lis quand même à titre d’information, car c’est toujours intéressant et quelque part très informatif.

De plus, comme le disait dernièrement « Jeb Dunnuck », que je respecte beaucoup (* citation originale au bas de la page), un Wine Critic se doit d’être 100% indépendant, couvrir le cout de chaque vol, nuit d’hôtel, repas et mode de transport, lors de voyages et visites dans les régions vitivinicoles, lui-même. Et pour des raisons très compréhensibles, afin d’éviter le favoritisme, les influences et les avis biaisés, ne devrait jamais accepter les cadeaux des vignobles ou de la profession et ne devrait pas être impliqué dans la vente publique directe de vin non plus.

Malheureusement, la plupart des « Wine Critics » (les plus connus) font complétement l’opposé (de ce qui est écrit au-dessus), ce qui m’a toujours fait me demander, et ce depuis une bonne dizaine d’année déjà, où se trouvent la crédibilité, l'impartialité et la sincérité, de certains critiques de vin, quand on voit certaines images et lis certaines choses dans certains articles sur leurs sites internet et leurs pages sur les réseaux sociaux, au sujet de repas ou de bouteilles offertes. On est en droit de se poser la question, non ?

Je sens que je ne vais pas me faire que des amis à dire choses pareilles, alors je referme cette parenthèse et ne vais pas m’étendre sur le sujet des « Wine Critics » et des « Notes » ou « scores », car je l’ai fait a maintes reprises dans d’autres « posts » sur ce blog, que vous pouvez lire, si intéressés, ici et ici. Et je reviens au sujet principal de ce post, le millésime 2020 a Bordeaux.

Alors, si vous voulez mon avis sur le Millésime 2020, à Bordeaux, après avoir gouté les 100+ vins « En primeur » de ce millésime 2020 (104 ou 105 pour être plus exact), cette après-midi, je dirais que c’est un « bon » millésime, voir « très bon » pour certains vins, mais ce n’est pas un « Grand » millésime comme certains « Wine Critics » et journalistes l’ont dit et écrit, ainsi que ce que j’ai pu l’entendre et le lire de la part de ceux qui n’ont pas d’avis propre et ne font que répéter ce qui a été dit et écrit, (et croyez moi il y en a beaucoup).

Vous allez me dire que 100 vins, ce n’est pas assez pour se faire une idée générale, voir plus globale, du millésime et de la qualité de ses vins. Je vous l’accorde et j’en conviens. Mais… (car il y a un « mais ») …faut-il le rappeler, ces vins sont justement des grands crus qui sont supposés êtres les exemples a suivre de leurs appellations respectives, et donc devrait être très représentatif de la qualité des vins et du millésime (en général) dans ces appellations, non ? (Si je me trompe, dites le moi de suite, mais je ne crois pas…)

Donc, si on part de ce principe, en goutant une bonne dizaine de grands crus pour chacune des appellations, on devrait pourvoir quand même avoir un bon aperçu de la qualité des vins et du millésime en général à mon avis. Voilà pourquoi, malgré le fait de n’avoir gouté qu’une centaine de vins pour l’instant, je me permets d’affirmer que le millésime 2020 est un bon millésime, voire très bon pour certains vins, mais ce n’est pas un grand millésime.

Un « grand » millésime est un millésime, en général, qui est très réussi et homogène en terme de qualité et d’expressions des vins dans son ensemble et dans le majorité des appellations de la régions. Ce qui n’est pas le cas pour le millésime 2020. De part ce que j’ai gouté aujourd’hui, je peux dire (comme la plupart des années précédentes d’ailleurs), certaines appellations sont bien meilleures et plus expressives que d’autres, et au sein même de ces appellations, tous les vins sont loin de présenter les mêmes qualités, pour des raisons de savoir-faire (ou non) et des raisons purement géographiques et topographiques aussi.

Et la encore, quand je parle de savoir-faire, je ne vais pas me faire des amis (mais tant pis), mais il me faut admettre qu’il y a des gens qui savent faire du bon vin et d’autres pas malheureusement. Et comme chaque année, lors de la dégustation des Primeurs ou d’autres millésimes avec l’UGCB, c’est plus ou moins sans réelles surprises, celles et ceux qui font du bon vin continuent de faire et leur vins se dégustent très bien, et celles et ceux qui ne savent pas faire du vin, continuent de ne pas s’améliorer et de faire du vin qui est loin de la qualité requise pour leur appellation et classification et surtout pour le prix qu’ils en demandent.




Voilà c’est dit ! Je vais me faire lyncher, c’est sûr, surtout que je l’ai souvent écrit en anglais, sur ce blog, mais je crois que c’est la première fois que je l’écrit en Français. Je l’ai même dit dans l’une des vidéos de ce post.







******** post progression en cours, sera fini très bientôt  *******  




Merci d'avoir lu mon post, soyez prudents et prenez soin de vous et de vos proches.   

Santé, 

LeDomduVin (a.k.a Dominique Noël) 






(*) J'ai tout mis au masculin et n'ai pas forcement écrit de façon inclusive à chaque fois que j'ai écrit « dégustateur », « acheteur », « gouteur », « acheteur », etc… (et autres), en ajoutant « -teuse » ou « -trice » (ou quoique ce soit d’autre à chaque fois) afin d’inclure la gente féminine, pour la raison évidente et compréhensible de fluidité du texte. Donc, rien de personnel, et surtout rien contre vous mesdames, bien au contraire. Ce qui, et soyez-en sûr, ne m’empêche pas de penser à vous et de vous confirmer que vous êtes bien sûr incluses à chaque fois dans tous mes propos et les situations décrites dans ce post. J’ai beaucoup de respect pour toutes les femmes en général, et surtout celles qui travaillent la vigne et les métiers du vin, où règnent encore, (malgré de légères améliorations à ce niveau ces dernières années), une aura et une attitude patriarcal, diminutive, stigmatisante, voire misogyne dans certains cas, dans ce monde encore trop dominé par les hommes et leur bêtise.






#france #lesphotosadom  #ledomduvin @ugcbwines #wine @ledomduvin #vin #bordeauxclassic #uniondesgrandscrusdebordeaux #wein #winetasting #vino #rosewoodhotel #ugcb #bordeaux #hongkong #tasting